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Food Pron

#21
(05-07-2019, 01:10 PM)SkiMask Wrote:
(05-07-2019, 10:23 AM)Junglist Tactikz Wrote: Nice! I did not know that would work. I have done this on ceramic cookware when my wife ran the temp too hot, but did not know it would work for stainless.

This also works on the burner plates of my gas stove.

I'm definitely going to try this next time instead of using abrasive chemicals. It doesn't harm the stainless, but still, I'd rather try to find another way.
I've never owned cast iron and believe my cooking growth has actually been stunted because those around me also did not have cast iron (to my knowledge) and only purchased the $100 box of variety. It's all I've ever known. Looking to broaden that horizon  because the other day I really wanted chops and my grill under maintenance seeing as no one sells rock grates anymore for the lava rock my backwards ass still running. 

REALLY want to make these changes...

Cast iron for all proteins other than light seafood. Although I can personally cook pretty much anything in CI and tend to prefer that trademark sear on most every meat I consume.

Stainless for stir fries and shit like shrimp and sauces.

This is all assuming you are cooking with fire on a gas range.
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#22
(05-07-2019, 06:05 PM)MACK IS GOD Wrote:
(05-07-2019, 01:10 PM)SkiMask Wrote: I've never owned cast iron and believe my cooking growth has actually been stunted because those around me also did not have cast iron (to my knowledge) and only purchased the $100 box of variety. It's all I've ever known. Looking to broaden that horizon  because the other day I really wanted chops and my grill under maintenance seeing as no one sells rock grates anymore for the lava rock my backwards ass still running. 

REALLY want to make these changes...
Cast iron for all proteins other than light seafood. Although I can personally cook pretty much anything in CI and tend to prefer that trademark sear on most every meat I consume.

Stainless for stir fries and shit like shrimp and sauces.

This is all assuming you are cooking with fire on a gas range.
Yeah? Noted. After thinking about it deeper I remember a friend growing up that cooked hamburgers almost daily over summer '93 and would drench each bite in ketchup and it would always gross me the fuck out, but what I now recall was that cast iron skillet or sauce pan with what I thought at the time was a wire mesh fish tank strainer (what we used for our tank) but was actually a grease spatter thing I'm reading is almost a necessity with these.

And is your advice any different if I have a ceramic smooth top electric stove? I grew up with gas and once I moved out on my own, have only ever dealt with electric. Am I doomed or...

Also, what's the thinking about these copper titanium things? What about the green skillets or Gotham steel? Is all that shit the Dupont stuff too? A ceramic "coating" seems suspect as all hell and made specifically for poor people.

After looking online, maybe it does make sense to buy one at a time and transition slowly over to stainless and maybe one good cast iron sauce pan versus a skillet to make use of it more?

Gonna have to get lost in all sorts of information about "seasoning" cleaning and maintenance I think. I honestly don't know shit but can follow a recipe and understand the basics.
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#23
(05-07-2019, 11:22 PM)SkiMask Wrote:
(05-07-2019, 06:05 PM)MACK IS GOD Wrote: Cast iron for all proteins other than light seafood. Although I can personally cook pretty much anything in CI and tend to prefer that trademark sear on most every meat I consume.

Stainless for stir fries and shit like shrimp and sauces.

This is all assuming you are cooking with fire on a gas range.


After looking online, maybe it does make sense to buy one at a time and transition slowly over to stainless and maybe one good cast iron sauce pan versus a skillet to make use of it more?

Gonna have to get lost in all sorts of information about "seasoning" cleaning and maintenance I think. I honestly don't know shit but can follow a recipe and understand the basics.

Like Mack said, stick to stainless for your sauces. .They deglaze much easier than a cast iron.

Best way to season cast iron when you first get it is to scrub it with warm soapy water and dry the crap out of it. Then spread a layer of vegetable oil, turn it upside down in an oven at 350-400 degrees and basically bake the thing for like an hour. Let it cool off before you try and remove it, LOL. if you season it right, you'll be able to fry eggs in the thing without fear  of sticking.

Cleaning it is also easy if your pan is seasoned. Get the excess food off the pan, then rinse under hot water while using a chain mail pad. If you still got food stuck on there use some kosher or a thick grained salt as an abrasive. Rinse, then dry right away. I also add a light layer of vegetable oil then put it away.

I looked this up a while ago, and also found flaxseed oil works well as a seasoning oil. I just use vegetable oil. It works just as well. Melted shortening will also probably work, too.


Forgot to add. After that initial soap usage when you first wash the pan, don't use soap on it ever again. If seasoned correctly, you won't even need to.
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#24
(05-08-2019, 08:44 AM)Junglist Tactikz Wrote: Forgot to add. After that initial soap usage when you first wash the pan, don't use soap on it ever again. If seasoned correctly, you won't even need to.
That part I do understand but what about "pre-seasoned" products? Should I just avoid those altogether and get a regular one and do the method you suggest? Seems like just another coating I want to avoid.

Could olive oil be used too? Just seeing so many reasons to abstain from industrial seed oils and I don't generally use lard or crisco in anything other than baking snickerdoodles a couple times a year.
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#25
(05-08-2019, 03:40 PM)SkiMask Wrote:
(05-08-2019, 08:44 AM)Junglist Tactikz Wrote: Forgot to add. After that initial soap usage when you first wash the pan, don't use soap on it ever again. If seasoned correctly, you won't even need to.
That part I do understand but what about "pre-seasoned" products? Should I just avoid those altogether and get a regular one and do the method you suggest? Seems like just another coating I want to avoid.

Could olive oil be used too? Just seeing so many reasons to abstain from industrial seed oils and I don't generally use lard or crisco in anything other than baking snickerdoodles a couple times a year.

I've used olive oil and I didn't like it. I am guessing that it is my fault. Common sense wise, it makes sense to use as it's a plant based fat like the others. I probably put too much on the pan, so when I went to bake it in, it turned sticky instead of that hard glossiness you're shooting for. I remember looking online and saw that this is common with olive oil and seasoning. I just use canola.

I'd say experiment and see what you like...
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#26
(05-08-2019, 04:06 PM)Junglist Tactikz Wrote:
(05-08-2019, 03:40 PM)SkiMask Wrote: That part I do understand but what about "pre-seasoned" products? Should I just avoid those altogether and get a regular one and do the method you suggest? Seems like just another coating I want to avoid.

Could olive oil be used too? Just seeing so many reasons to abstain from industrial seed oils and I don't generally use lard or crisco in anything other than baking snickerdoodles a couple times a year.
I've used olive oil and I didn't like it. I am guessing that it is my fault. Common sense wise, it makes sense to use as it's a plant based fat like the others. I probably put too much on the pan, so when I went to bake it in, it turned sticky instead of that hard glossiness you're shooting for. I remember looking online and saw that this is common with olive oil and seasoning. I just use canola.

I'd say experiment and see what you like...
Sounds good. I will probably just follow your lead and do the dang thing. It's not like I'm using it directly in the food but rather to coat the pan to that smooth shine you speak of. I'm excited to try something new and think burgers and chops are on the immediate horizon. I'm also fascinated by your recommend of the reverse sear method and am anxious to give it a try.
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#27
(05-08-2019, 04:06 PM)Junglist Tactikz Wrote:
(05-08-2019, 03:40 PM)SkiMask Wrote: That part I do understand but what about "pre-seasoned" products? Should I just avoid those altogether and get a regular one and do the method you suggest? Seems like just another coating I want to avoid.

Could olive oil be used too? Just seeing so many reasons to abstain from industrial seed oils and I don't generally use lard or crisco in anything other than baking snickerdoodles a couple times a year.

I've used olive oil and I didn't like it. I am guessing that it is my fault. Common sense wise, it makes sense to use as it's a plant based fat like the others. I probably put too much on the pan, so when I went to bake it in, it turned sticky instead of that hard glossiness you're shooting for. I remember looking online and saw that this is common with olive oil and seasoning. I just use canola.

I'd say experiment and see what you like...

Could have been EV?

Smoke point is so low that it could have burnt off before it glazed to the iron. Olive oil, while obviously the good standard, is far too glorified IMO. Grapeseed, peanut, and other blends can be just as good of not better than Olive oil depending on what's being cooked and at what temperature.

Got assholes out here pan frying shit using high heat and EV Olive oil.

Went to my GFs sisters place for dinner a few weeks back and the whole place smelled like rancid burnt Olive oil because this stupid cunt was frying off pork chops in a stainless pan with EV Olive oil. Took every ounce of self control not to punch her in the face.
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#28
(05-08-2019, 07:58 PM)MACK IS GOD Wrote:
(05-08-2019, 04:06 PM)Junglist Tactikz Wrote: I've used olive oil and I didn't like it. I am guessing that it is my fault. Common sense wise, it makes sense to use as it's a plant based fat like the others. I probably put too much on the pan, so when I went to bake it in, it turned sticky instead of that hard glossiness you're shooting for. I remember looking online and saw that this is common with olive oil and seasoning. I just use canola.

I'd say experiment and see what you like...
Could have been EV?

Smoke point is so low that it could have burnt off before it glazed to the iron. Olive oil, while obviously the good standard, is far too glorified IMO. Grapeseed, peanut, and other blends can be just as good of not better than Olive oil depending on what's being cooked and at what temperature.

Got assholes out here pan frying shit using high heat and EV Olive oil.

Went to my GFs sisters place for dinner a few weeks back and the whole place smelled like rancid burnt Olive oil because this stupid cunt was frying off pork chops in a stainless pan with EV Olive oil. Took every ounce of self control not to punch her in the face.
That actually makes me feel a bit better because all I generally use is grape seed for just about everything. I wasn't able to discern if it was on the hit list with all the others. 

It can be a bit overwhelming at times, all the information you have to sift through, but gonna stick with grape. Probably will still season it as Jung mentioned though. 

Also, if I were to ever want to fry something I cannot stand that smell you just referred and would probably just plug in a fry pappy outside on the stoop or something so I didn't stink up the fuckin house for a month or more. Always would use peanut for that.

Last thing, would you still keep a flat, coated griddle for pancakes or do ya'll put that in the cast iron too?
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#29
(05-08-2019, 07:58 PM)MACK IS GOD Wrote:
(05-08-2019, 04:06 PM)Junglist Tactikz Wrote: I've used olive oil and I didn't like it. I am guessing that it is my fault. Common sense wise, it makes sense to use as it's a plant based fat like the others. I probably put too much on the pan, so when I went to bake it in, it turned sticky instead of that hard glossiness you're shooting for. I remember looking online and saw that this is common with olive oil and seasoning. I just use canola.

I'd say experiment and see what you like...

Could have been EV?

Smoke point is so low that it could have burnt off before it glazed to the iron. Olive oil, while obviously the good standard, is far too glorified IMO. Grapeseed, peanut, and other blends can be just as good of not better than Olive oil depending on what's being cooked and at what temperature.

Got assholes out here pan frying shit using high heat and EV Olive oil.

Went to my GFs sisters place for dinner a few weeks back and the whole place smelled like rancid burnt Olive oil because this stupid cunt was frying off pork chops in a stainless pan with EV Olive oil. Took every ounce of self control not to punch her in the face.
Agreed. I was going to mention to make sure you mind that smoke point with Olive oil. If you are going to use it to season, I would consider lowering the temperature and then going longer than an hour. And Mack, to answer, no it was regular Olive Oil, not EV. I only use EV for dressings and to mix with cheese for dipping crusty bread in, or as a drizzle on top of foods. Like I said, I probably just laid it on thick. I use canola now for seasoning, and it does what it's supposed to do.

I use Olive Oil to pan fry all the time, but only when I want to actually have that taste in with the food. Otherwise I primarily use canola oil. I also keep the temp lower than normal and just cook it for a bit longer than cranking that knob up to 9 or HI and destroying my kitchen. I'll keep the temp at medium, medium high and it works every time. Olive Oil is absolutely overglorified, but I've had the Greek and Italian varieties in my house since birth, so it's a major part of my cuisine. All of the other oils mentioned are just as good if you are going to use it for frying. I learned from my parents how to cook with Olive Oil, who learned from theirs, so on and so on.

The overglorification has led to instances you speak of with the pork chops. it's a great fat to cook in, but so few know how to do it right.

Also, apologies for any confusion. Went back over some of these posts and saw I use vegetable oil and canola oil in my comments. I use the term loosely because I grew up calling canola and vegetable oil just vegetable oil. Didn't even call Olive Oil by its name; it was just "the oil". I use canola oil for all non Olive Oil tasks.

(05-08-2019, 09:20 PM)SkiMask Wrote:
(05-08-2019, 07:58 PM)MACK IS GOD Wrote: Could have been EV?

Smoke point is so low that it could have burnt off before it glazed to the iron. Olive oil, while obviously the good standard, is far too glorified IMO. Grapeseed, peanut, and other blends can be just as good of not better than Olive oil depending on what's being cooked and at what temperature.

Got assholes out here pan frying shit using high heat and EV Olive oil.

Went to my GFs sisters place for dinner a few weeks back and the whole place smelled like rancid burnt Olive oil because this stupid cunt was frying off pork chops in a stainless pan with EV Olive oil. Took every ounce of self control not to punch her in the face.
That actually makes me feel a bit better because all I generally use is grape seed for just about everything. I wasn't able to discern if it was on the hit list with all the others. 

It can be a bit overwhelming at times, all the information you have to sift through, but gonna stick with grape. Probably will still season it as Jung mentioned though. 

Also, if I were to ever want to fry something I cannot stand that smell you just referred and would probably just plug in a fry pappy outside on the stoop or something so I didn't stink up the fuckin house for a month or more. Always would use peanut for that.

Last thing, would you still keep a flat, coated griddle for pancakes or do ya'll put that in the cast iron too?

I use a flat top electric griddle for pancakes, but if you have your cast iron seasoned right, you can absolutely cook them in there.

I use the griddle for pancakes because I can pop 6 on there at a time, then use my pans for other things like bacon or eggs while running cakes off the griddle.
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#30
(05-06-2019, 07:25 PM)Junglist Tactikz Wrote: That sounds amazing bro. Wish I could get my pork shoulder pics to upload...I treid to upload them to imgur then here, but had issues.
Use the "Direct Link" that appears after a bit when you drill into the image itself. Remember it's not ready immediately with the link provided. You have to wait a minute or two, head out to your profile page then drill back in and it will give you the 6 panel options to embed, link, etc.

Can't wait to see them. You always snap some delicious and it's always appreciated.
[Image: tenor.gif?itemid=10563840]
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